Are advertisers spending effectively according to media’s ability?

The chart shows how much time individuals spend with each medium (as a percentage of their total media consumption hours) and advertising spent per medium (as a percentage of total advertising spending).

It reveals that ad spending on newspapers and magazines is higher than on TV. We assume that more money is invested in newspaper/magazine advertising, even though individuals spend more hours with TV, because readers are more targeted audiences.

Share of Average Time Spent per Day with Select Media by US Adults vs. US Ad Spending Share, 2009-2012 (% of total)
Average Time Spent per Day with Major Media by US Adults, 2009-2012 (minutes)

 

2009 2010 2011 2012
minutes Time spentshare Ad spendingshare minutes Time spentshare Ad spendingshare minutes Time spentshare Ad spendingshare minutes Time spentshare Ad spendingshare
TV and video 267 42.20% 36.50% 264 40.90% 38.40% 274 40.40% 38.30% 278 39.80% 38.90%
Online 146 23.10% 15.20% 155 24.00% 16.60% 167 24.60% 19.30% 173 24.80% 20.90%
Radio 98 15.50% 9.70% 96 14.90% 9.90% 94 13.90% 9.60% 92 13.20% 9.30%
Mobile (nonvoice) 22 3.50% 0.30% 34 5.30% 0.50% 54 8.00% 0.90% 82 11.70% 1.60%
Print* 55 8.7%** 27.30% 50 7.7%** 24.70% 44 6.5%** 22.60% 38 5.4%** 20.70%
—Newspapers 33 5.20% 16.80% 30 4.60% 14.80% 26 3.80% 13.10% 22 3.10% 11.50%
—Magazines 22 3.50% 10.50% 20 3.10% 9.90% 18 2.70% 9.60% 16 2.30% 9.20%
Other 44 47 45 36
Total 632 646 678 699

Source: eMarketer, Sep & Oct 2012

 

2009 2010 2011 2012 Targeted(least=1, Most=7)
Print $0.52 $0.53 $0.56 $0.62 3
—Magazines $0.50 $0.53 $0.58 $0.65 4
—Newspapers $0.53 $0.53 $0.55 $0.60 5
TV $0.14 $0.16 $0.15 $0.16 1
Online $0.11 $0.12 $0.13 $0.14 6
Radio $0.10 $0.11 $0.11 $0.12 2
Mobile (nonvoice) $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 $0.01 7
Total $0.17 $0.17 $0.16 $0.16

Source: eMarketer, Sep & Oct 2012

If the level of targeting possible is what determines in which medium advertising dollars are invested, Internet and cell phone advertising will likely increase in the near future.

 

Assessing FOIA – Kuriyama/Thorne revision

On the verge of a second Obama term, the country is, understandably, looking ahead: What will the economy look like over the next four years? What about healthcare, jobs, the conflict in Afghanistan? But it’s worth stopping for a moment to look back – at the promises the President made when he first took office, and whether or not he’s lived up to his own stated goals.

On the President’s very first full day in office, he issued a memorandum asking federal officials to “usher in a new era of open government,” and make the workings of the government more transparent and accessible to the average citizen.  He wrote: “In our democracy, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which encourages accountability through transparency, is the most prominent expression of a profound national commitment to ensuring an open Government.” Later that day, in an address to the new Cabinet and White House staffers, the President added: “I expect members of my administration not simply to live up to the letter but also the spirit of this law.”

We decided to take a look at how three of the largest and most headline-making federal agencies – the Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Defense – have handled their FOIA requests over the course of President Obama’s first term in office. Has their responsiveness, their processing time changed over the past four years? And what can we gather about the administration’s transparency, based on these changes?

According to a Bloomberg investigation, in 2009, “cabinet agencies employed exemptions 466,402 times, a 50 percent jump from the last year of George W. Bush’s presidency.” The number of exemptions have since declined by nearly a quarter, but are, as Bloomberg notes, “still are above the level seen during the Bush administration.”

In a recent twist, at least 25 federal agencies have been outsourcing parts of the FOIA fulfillment process to private corporations – an arrangement worth over $26 billion in FY2012 alone. Some of the companies aren’t even based in the United States, making them exempt from a number of the FOIA fulfillment guidelines. Yet these contractors are responsible for making crucial decisions like what data to release, what to redact, and when to make it available (or not). This development raises pressing questions about what government transparency really means in the Obama era – questions we hope to start addressing with this story.

FOIA DATA

Redesign assignments

Redesign1
In this part, I put each data of states on the US map and national data on the top,
because I like the idea of image to characterize each states.
When you click on the map, detail will be shown.

 

Redesign2
To illustrate the comparison between states in a single sight, I made the sizes of states to
be proportionate to the percentages. Also I put colors according to the number of percentage.
Detailed data of each states are shown when clicked.
I was totally inspired by the election map of New York Times.

(The data on this map are mock.)

 

 

REVISED Kuriyama/Thorne pitch

Using Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) data provided by the federal government, we want to assess the openness of the three large and powerful law enforcement/intelligence agencies: the Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Defense. How many FOIA requests does each agency get per year? How many does it fulfill, and how many does it reject? How long does it take to respond? Are some agencies more responsive than others?

These agencies all deal in sensitive matters, and they’ve all had their share of controversy in recent years. So we want to see if their accessibility has changed over the course of President Obama’s tenure, maybe as a response to events in the news, and in the administration itself.

As the election approaches and Americans consider the effectiveness of the last four years, this issue is especially timely and vital.

To place our findings in context, we’ll be going after interviews with:
– Robert Freeman, Executive Director of the New York State Committee on Open Government and lawyer with FOIA/FOIL expertise
– Danielle Ivory, Bloomberg reporter focusing on FOIA issues and government accountability
– Representative from the Sunlight Foundation, a nonprofit group advocating greater government transparency

 

Kuriyama/Thorne pitch

It’s 2008, and Barack Obama’s just been elected President. One of his first vows in office: that transparency will be a “touchstone” of his term. Four years later, has the Obama administration lived up to this promise?

Using Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) data provided by the Department of Justice, we want to assess accessibility and openness of government agencies. How many FOIA requests does each agency get per year? How many does it fulfill, and how many does it reject? How long does it take to respond? Are some agencies more responsive than others? Has their responsiveness changed over time and under different presidents?

To place our findings in context, we’ll be going after interviews with:
– Robert Freeman, Executive Director of the New York State Committee on Open Government and lawyer with FOIA/FOIL expertise
– Danielle Ivory, Bloomberg reporter focusing on FOIA issues and government accountability
– Representative from the Sunlight Foundation, a nonprofit group advocating greater government transparency

Now is the time to ask these questions. With the debates in full swing and the election just three weeks away, what better moment to see whether the President’s lived up to one of his central campaign promises?